Extended 9th Chords For Guitar Part 2

Learn how to play extended 9th chords

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Extended Chords For Guitar Part 2

Extended 9th Chords: Different Types & How They’re Formed 9th Chords.

Extended 9th Chords

Now it’s time to get even more extended. Major and minor scales only have seven notes, so how do you build a chord using the ninth? As you may have guessed, the ninth scale degree is essentially the second scale degree but in the next octave up.

In most cases ninth chords include both the seventh and the ninth scale degrees; for this reason ninth chords have more variations. This is actually the case for most chords which have an interval greater than seventh.

You will also notice that in some of these voicing the 5th note is not included as this note doesn’t anything harmonically to the chord, the more defining notes are the 3rd and the 7th notes.

Major 9th Chords:

In the case of a major 9th chord you simply take your major triad (1st, 3rd, 5th) add the 7th, and then the 9th. It is the addition of the 9th that changes the vibe of the chord to an even more relaxed sounding chord.

Major 9th Chords

Minor 9th Chords:

n the case of a minor 9th chord you simply take your minor triad (1st, b3rd, 5th) add the b7th (to create the m7 chord), and then the 9th. It is the addition of the 9th that changes the vibe of the chord to an even more relaxed sounding chord.

Minor 9th Chords

Dominant 9 Chords:

You can substitute any dominant 7th chord by a dominant 9th (9) chord. This way it adds a little more interest to the sound indeed, 9th chords can helpcreate a more sophisticated and cool sound to your guitar playing. These are great chords for blues, funk and jazz. They naturally occur on chord V in the major scale and is the only type with both a 7th and 9th.

Dominant

Next Lesson we look at some 11th and 13th extended chords.